Improved working with Human Centric Lighting

November 8, 2018

Lighting Technology is now enabling organisations to create optimum working environments that mimic natural daylight and support employees to work more efficiently.

Human-centric lighting is starting to be installed in organisations across Europe and is especially effective in buildings with poor natural daylight and in countries with long dark winters.

Lux Review have published an example of how a Norwegian bank has installed LED luminaires, with a Lighting Control solution that mimics natural daylight by changing the colour temperature and intensity throughout the day.

 

The lighting evolves throughout the day based on a set pattern:

Early morning: 450 lux warm white

Late morning: 800 lux, cold white

Lunchtime: 450 lux warm white

Early afternoon: 800 lux, cold white

Late afternoon: 450 lux warm white

 

The lighting mimics daylight by changing intensity and colour temperature throughout the day to improve concentration, prevent sleeping disorders by helping to set occupants’ sleep-wake cycles and provide an enhanced sense of wellbeing.  You can read the full Lux Review article here.

 

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Our Projects Team will work with you to create a bespoke lighting solution based on your individual needs.  We will help you identify key project objectives e.g. 70 % Energy Saving, Intelligent Lighting Controls for personalisation and Energy Saving, Human Centric Lighting to boost productivity.  We will then create a detailed lighting proposal identifying key product benefits, energy savings, installation programme, costs and payback period.

 

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Human-centric lighting delivers 800 lux boost to bankers

The SpareBank 1 Nord-Norge branch office – just 50 miles (80 kilometres) south of the Arctic Circle – is one of the first banks in Europe to install so-called human-centric lighting. It’s hoped that the dynamic lighting will reduce ‘Polar night depression’ for daylight-starved residents of extreme northern regions.

The lighting mimics daylight by changing intensity and colour temperature throughout the day to improve concentration, prevent sleeping disorders by helping to set occupants’ sleep-wake cycles and provide an enhanced sense of wellbeing.

‘Between five and 10 per cent of the population struggles with Polar night depression,’ the bank’s technical boss Øystein Eikrem told Lux. ‘This leads to dejected humour, low level of energy, diminished motivation and constant fatigue. These annoyances can be reduced with the right lighting, and therefore human-centric lighting is even more important for us who live in a country with a long winter.’

The lighting system in the team rooms for the 36 employees are preset according to a fixed day cycle. In the morning when the staff arrive at work, the lighting is warm white.

After a while the lighting shifts to cold white and lighting intensity is increased to 800 lux, before it is lowered again, and turning warmer towards lunchtime. After lunch the blue-white tones increase again, before they decline towards the end of the day, and the warm white light becomes more prominent.

In the meeting and quiet rooms it is possible to adjust the light in three categories – normal lighting (4000 kelvin, 500 lux), calm lighting (3000 kelvin, 500 lux) and focus lighting (6000 kelvin, 800 lux), as required.

The lighting mimics daylight by changing intensity and colour temperature throughout the day to improve concentration, prevent sleeping disorders by helping to set occupants’ sleep-wake cycles and provide an enhanced sense of wellbeing.

‘Several research reports, including from the Netherlands and Norway, reveal positive results from use of human-centric lighting in office environments and schools respectively. This is new and – to say the least – exciting. If human-centric lighting can result in enhanced wellbeing, and a decline in sick leave, then it’s a win-win situation for everyone,’ says Eikrem.

‘Our most important resources are the people who work in the bank. Then we must organise it so that they have the best conditions. Not just inviting, pleasant work environments, but we must also implement the best technological arrangements for them that includes future oriented lighting. It also promotes a more enjoyable experience for those visiting the bank.

‘We are waiting in anticipation to see how much job satisfaction improves and how much sick leave declines, as we believe it will’.

The luminaires and light management system are supplied by human-centric lighting pioneer Glamox. ‘This is the first time we have installed human-centric in a bank, and this will be rolled out in many of the bank’s locations,’ said Glamox sales engineer Espen Ytterstad.

‘So it’s a pilot project for us and the bank. The bank is daring to invest in creating the ultimate in a working environment, and that their people really enjoy their job.’

‘We’ve only just moved in, and can see we have plenty of light and good lighting,’ said bank branch manager Tor Magne Aanonli. ‘Even though It is still light outside, we can’t wait to see what it will be like when the days start to darken’.

 

You can find out more about Human Centric Lighting at LuxLive 2018 where it will be a key theme within the Lighting for Workplace and Wellbeing Conference track.  LuxLive 2018 takes place on Wednesday 14 November and Thursday 15 November 2018, See the full programme HERE.  LuxLive is FREE to attend, get your ticket today by registering HERE.